Photo: Andrew Parsons for Action Against Hunger, South Sudan

Food Security & Livelihoods

What We Do

Action Against Hunger’s food security and livelihoods programs tackle the root causes of hunger by addressing problems of production, access, and income. Encompassing a wide array of activities customized to meet a community’s specific needs, our programs are designed to bolster agricultural production, jumpstart local market activity, support micro-enterprise initiatives, and otherwise enhance a vulnerable community’s access to sustainable sources of food and income.

In 2019, we improved access to food and income for 2.4 million people around the world. We also helped 215,666 to prepare for and reduce the risk of disaster. 

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Evaluate Local Needs

To determine what factors are driving hunger in a given area, Action Against Hunger carries out comprehensive evaluations by collecting and analyzing key data on local assets, resources, and livelihoods strategies. Our teams meet directly with community members to better understand local conditions and create a collaborative plan of action.

Respond to Emergencies

When disasters destroy infrastructure and food supplies, when violence forces thousands to flee, or when drought disrupts food production, Action Against Hunger responds with distributions of food, cash, and other items to prevent hunger in the short-term and ensure that crops can be replanted and livestock restocked in the future.

Provide Long-Term Solutions

Designed in collaboration with local populations, our strategies are context-specific: micro-grant support for families recovering from conflict, seeds and tools for agricultural recovery, livestock and veterinary services where needed, small business assistance, and other programs that help families regain self-sufficiency.

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Food Security & Livelihoods Facts

  • Micronutrient deficiency affects 2 billion people making them susceptible to long-term, irreversible health effects, as well as having damaging socio-economic consequences.
  • If women farmers had the same access to productive resources as men, it could reduce the number of hungry people in the world by up to 17% due to increased crop yields.
  • After years of progress, for the fourth year in a row, there has been a rise in world hunger. There are nearly 60 million more undernourished people now than in 2014. If this trend continues, the number of undernourished people will exceed 840 million by 2030.

 

For Action. Against Hunger.

We save the lives of children and their families. We will never give up. Until the world is free from hunger.