Learn about our response to the worst food insecurity situation in the world. Read more »

2013 Typhoon Haiyan

The Philippines Exhausts Its Alphabet of Natural Disasters

Perhaps it is only this running out of letters -- these A to Z typhoons -- that, to some extent, accounts for the attitude of Tacloban's citizens: always self-controlled, smiling, friendly, and polite, they keep on doing whatever they can to improve their situation. Many have lost every last thing they had, and many still have no idea what happened to their families. Numerous children are on their own, with no living relatives.

Typhoon Haiyan: fears not all survivors have been reached

"There's an urgent call now for us to monitor the movement of foreign aid funds for [the typhoon] so they will go exactly where they're supposed to: to the survivors," Richard Moya, the budget undersecretary and chief information officer, said in a statement, announcing the creation of a website to facilitate such scrutiny.

The Philippines government said more than $270m in foreign aid has been pledged –although Action Against Hunger warned this weekend that promised donations often fail to materialise after natural disasters.

Surviving Typhoon Haiyan: "Things Are Starting to Get Better."

Condora Acosta, a resident of Tacloban, rocks her 20-month-old nephew, Lestor Yen, as she waits to receive a hygiene kit from Action Against Hunger’s emergency response teams. Condora is one of many survivors who sought refuge at her local church after Typhoon Haiyan devastated her community.

Surviving Typhoon Haiyan: “Now, our priorities are to find shelter, food, and water.”

“This has always been our land,” says Geronima Merales, a 60-year-old resident of Tanawan, a village a few miles south of Tacloban. Geronima has lived in Tanawan her entire life, but last week, she lost the only home she’d ever known to severe floods caused by Typhoon Haiyan. And she was not the only one affected—the typhoon tore through Tanawan, destroying the homes of 3,500 villagers. 

One Week After Typhoon Haiyan, Racing to Restore Water Systems, Prevent Disease

One week ago, Typhoon Haiyan—the deadliest typhoon to ever make landfall—struck the Philippines, leaving a massive humanitarian disaster in its wake: it is now estimated that nearly thirteen million people have been affected across nine regions, four million of whom have lost their homes.

Surviving Typhoon Haiyan: "I Needed to Find My Family a Safe Place."

“I was really scared,” says Sam Mutthar, a 56-year-old father from Tacloban. He was in Singapore when he got the news that the deadly Typhoon Haiyan had hit the Philippines.

Finding his family

Scared for his wife and children, who were caught in the deadly storm, Sam returned to the Philippines as soon as he could. He describes his arduous journey home:  

Surviving Typhoon Haiyan: “I Knew I Had to Hold On a Little More.”

“All the houses that stood around mine were destroyed, but mine somehow stayed standing,” says Vita Landeline Garrido, a 63 year-old resident of Tacloban. 

Typhoon Haiyan: The View From The Ground

1. Above, a mother and daughter who evacuated their homes due to Typhoon Haiyan. They've relocated near the Tacloban airport.

Tacloban, Philippines. Courtesy Daniel Burgui

2. A woman walks part of the national highway that links the Tacloban airport with the city center.

“They Need Urgent Help”: Nearly Twelve Million People Affected by Typhoon Haiyan

In the Philippines, the already staggering number of people impacted by the devastation of Typhoon Haiyan keeps growing: across the country, some 11.8 million people have been affected, nearly one million of whom have been displaced from their homes.

On the Ground in the Philippines: “The Situation is Terrible.”

In the wake of Typhoon Haiyan, Action Against Hunger’s teams have been working tirelessly to provide aid to vulnerable areas. Yesterday, we deployed an emergency response team from Manila to receive the second cargo plane carrying 21 tons of water and sanitation equipment and food rations into Tacloban. These emergency supplies are desperately needed: this devastating storm has left more than 11 million people without food, water, or shelter.

Pages

About Action Against Hunger | ACF International

Action Against Hunger is internationally recognized as a leader in the fight against global malnutrition. Action Against Hunger works to save the lives of malnourished children while providing communities with access to safe water and sustainable solutions to hunger. With over 30 years of expertise in emergency situations of conflict, natural disaster, and chronic food insecurity, Action Against Hunger runs life-saving programs in some 40 countries benefiting 5 million people each year.

Subscribe to news and alerts or donate now »

Subscribe to RSS - 2013 Typhoon Haiyan