South Sudan Marks 3rd Anniversary Amid Crisis. Read Our Immersive Report »

2011 Horn of Africa Drought

With life-threatening conditions reaching catastrophic levels in parts of Eastern Africa, the United Nations took the extraordinary step of declaring famine in parts of Somalia, a classification defined by mortality rates greater than two people per 10,000 per day across a specific region, along with skyrocketing rates of deadly malnutrition (above 30% for children under five), among other indicators.

Voices from the Horn of Africa: Fatima and Abdi

Fatima Adam owns a grocery store in Eskot, a town in Garbatulla in central Kenya. The shop earned enough to provide for her family until a severe drought—the country’s worst in 60 years—left her shelves bare and her customers, most of whom earn money by farming, with little to spend. Her income declined badly and, at the height of the drought, access to food became less and less reliable.  As a result, her young son, Abdi, now suffers from malnutrition.

USAID provides more than $30 Million in Humanitarian Assistance

In response to the flooding that occurred in Cotabato City and Maguindanao in July 2011, USAID/OFDA partnered with Action Against Hunger (ACF) with a grant of $100,000. This enabled ACF to distribute hygiene kits and repair water sources to more than 12,500 persons.

Horn of Africa Crisis: What We're Doing in Ethiopia

Across Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia, and Djibouti, we’re helping thousands of children in the hardest-hit regions—from the 3,000 malnourished children we’re treating in Somalia, to our efforts in Garbatulla, Kenya, where one in five children is now malnourished. We’re racing to reduce the impact of water shortages by constructing wells, drilling boreholes, and installing storage devices to capture future rainfall, in addition to promoting hygiene to prevent the spread of diarrhea, cholera, and other water-borne diseases.

Horn of Africa Crisis: What We're Doing in Djibouti

Across Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia, and Djibouti, we’re helping thousands of children in the hardest-hit regions—from the 3,000 malnourished children we’re treating in Somalia, to our efforts in Garbatulla, Kenya, where one in five children is now malnourished. We’re racing to reduce the impact of water shortages by constructing wells, drilling boreholes, and installing storage devices to capture future rainfall, in addition to promoting hygiene to prevent the spread of diarrhea, cholera, and other water-borne diseases.

Horn of Africa Crisis: What We're Doing in Kenya

Across Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia, and Djibouti, we’re helping thousands of children in the hardest-hit regions—from the 3,000 malnourished children we’re treating in Somalia, to our efforts in Garbatulla, Kenya, where one in five children is now malnourished. We’re racing to reduce the impact of water shortages by constructing wells, drilling boreholes, and installing storage devices to capture future rainfall, in addition to promoting hygiene to prevent the spread of diarrhea, cholera, and other water-borne diseases.

Horn of Africa Crisis: What We're Doing in Somalia

Across Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia, and Djibouti, we’re helping thousands of children in the hardest-hit regions—from the 3,000 malnourished children we’re treating in Somalia, to our efforts in Garbatulla, Kenya, where one in five children is now malnourished. We’re racing to reduce the impact of water shortages by constructing wells, drilling boreholes, and installing storage devices to capture future rainfall, in addition to promoting hygiene to prevent the spread of diarrhea, cholera, and other water-borne diseases.

Horn of Africa Crisis: Progress to Date, Daunting Challenges Ahead

Given the immense scale of the humanitarian disaster affecting the Greater Horn of Africa—some 12 million people across four countries—we fear this devastating food crisis will continue well into next year. Even as we struggle to reach everyone in need of help, it’s clear that hundreds of thousands of families will remain in urgent need of food and assistance in the coming months, even if the rains arrive later this year.

Voices from the Horn of Africa: Baby Abdullahi

Looking at her now, it's hard to believe that just a few weeks ago, seven-month-old Abdullahi was near death, suffering from severe acute malnutrition.

Her young mother, Halima, 17, had tried everything in her power to make her baby better but Abdullahi continued to grow weaker by the day.  First she stopped playing, then she became lethargic. She no longer smiled. Due to circumstances beyond her mother's control, baby Abdullahi simply was not getting the nutrition that every young child needs in order to thrive. 

Somali refugees stuck in limbo in Ethiopian camp

"Some 120,000 refugees fleeing drought and violence are stranded in the Dolo Ado camp on the border between Ethiopia, Somalia and Kenya. Though they're receiving food and medical care, many face an uncertain future...'Around 1,200 new refugees arrive here every day, of which we screen about 600,' Phil James, an aid worker from charity 'Action Against Hunger,' says. Between 30 and 60 percent of the children are malnourished, he says...The emergency medical wards at Dolo Ado are operated by French and Dutch nationals."

Pages

About Action Against Hunger | ACF International

Action Against Hunger is internationally recognized as a leader in the fight against global malnutrition. Action Against Hunger works to save the lives of malnourished children while providing communities with access to safe water and sustainable solutions to hunger. With over 30 years of expertise in emergency situations of conflict, natural disaster, and chronic food insecurity, Action Against Hunger runs life-saving programs in some 40 countries benefiting 5 million people each year.

Subscribe to news and alerts or donate now »

Subscribe to RSS - 2011 Horn of Africa Drought