Publications

Action Against Hunger South Sudan, T.Frank
Action Against Hunger South Sudan, T.Frank

Action Against Hunger’s international network produces a variety of published works from context analysis and regional assessments to community surveys and field reports.

Recent Publications

Sowing the Seeds of Good Nutrition; Kenya Case Study: Reconciling Agriculture and Nutrition

October, 2013

This study analyzes the integration of nutrition concerns into agricultural and food security interventions in Kenya, and is part of a wider study that includes Burkina Faso and Peru. The study answers the following three questions: (1) How do agricultural policies and programmes integrate nutritional issues? (2) What are the main constraints to designing and implementing nutrition-sensitive agricultural interventions? (3) What could be the main recommendations to alleviate these constraints?

The State of Global SAM Management Coverage - 2012

October, 2013

"The State of Global SAM Management Coverage 2012” , an annex to the Global Global SAM Management Update, Update, was produced jointly by UNICEF, ACF-UK and the Coverage Monitoring Network. The annex was designed to encourage further debate, discussion and research by reviewing the availability, accessibility and coverage of SAM management worldwide and providing a brief summary of opportunities and challenges ahead.

Access for All: Volume 1

June, 2013

Is community-based treatment of severe acute malnutrition (SAM) at scale capable of meeting global needs? This report, the first in a three part series, offers a comparative assessment of the performance and effectiveness of the model during distinct periods: when the majority of community-based treatment were administered by NGOs, and when community-based treatment programmes were integrated by ministries of health into regular health services.

Accès Pour Tous: Volume 1

June, 2013

Is community-based treatment of severe acute malnutrition (SAM) at scale capable of meeting global needs? This report, the first in a three part series, offers a comparative assessment of the performance and effectiveness of the model during distinct periods: when the majority of community-based treatment were administered by NGOs, and when community-based treatment programmes were integrated by ministries of health into regular health services.

Pages